CDC

Cytomegalovirus vaccines under clinical development

Author List
Mark Schleiss

Abstract

Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common infectious cause of disability in newborn infants. CMV also causes serious disease in solid organ (SOT) and haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. In otherwise healthy children and adults, primary CMV infection rarely causes illness. However, even asymptomatic CMV infections may predispose an individual towards an increased risk of atherosclerosis, cancer and immune senescence over the life course, although such associations remain controversial. Thus, although a vaccine against congenital CMV infection would have the greatest public health impact and cost-effectiveness, arguably all populations could benefit from an effective immunisation against this virus. Currently there are no licensed CMV vaccines, but there is increased interest in developing and testing potential candidates, driven by the demonstration that a recombinant CMV glycoprotein B (gB) vaccine has some efficacy in prevention of infection in young women and adolescents, and in CMV-seronegative SOT recipients. In this review, the recent and current status of candidate CMV vaccines is discussed. Evolving concepts about proposed correlates of protective immunity in different target populations for CMV vaccination, and how these differences impact current clinical trials, are also reviewed.

Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common infectious cause of disability in newborn infants. CMV also causes serious disease in solid organ (SOT) and haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. In otherwise healthy children and adults, primary CMV infection rarely causes illness. However, even asymptomatic CMV infections may predispose an individual towards an increased risk of atherosclerosis, cancer and immune senescence over the life course, although such associations remain controversial. Thus, although a vaccine against congenital CMV infection would have the greatest public health impact and cost-effectiveness, arguably all populations could benefit from an effective immunisation against this virus. Currently there are no licensed CMV vaccines, but there is increased interest in developing and testing potential candidates, driven by the demonstration that a recombinant CMV glycoprotein B (gB) vaccine has some efficacy in prevention of infection in young women and adolescents, and in CMV-seronegative SOT recipients. In this review, the recent and current status of candidate CMV vaccines is discussed. Evolving concepts about proposed correlates of protective immunity in different target populations for CMV vaccination, and how these differences impact current clinical trials, are also reviewed.

Article Category

CMV

Article Type

Reviews

Posted Date

06-10-2016

File Name
1475733022jve-2-198.pdf

Cytomegalovirus vaccines under clinical development

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