HIV persistence in the CNS: the final frontier for a cure?

Author List
Sharon R Lewin
John W Mellors

Abstract

Understanding how often, where, and by which mechanisms HIV persists in the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for preventing and managing CNS-related HIV complications and for designing strategies to achieve a cure of HIV infection. In this issue of the Journal of Virus Eradication, Joseph et al. [1] report on a ground breaking meeting convened by the National Institutes of Mental Health on ‘Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV-1 Escape’ with the goals of elucidating key knowledge gaps about this newly recognised entity, establishing a research agenda and assembling a ‘Global HIV-1 CSF Escape Consortium’ to fill these gaps.

Understanding how often, where, and by which mechanisms HIV persists in the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for preventing and managing CNS-related HIV complications and for designing strategies to achieve a cure of HIV infection. In this issue of the Journal of Virus Eradication, Joseph et al. [1] report on a ground breaking meeting convened by the National Institutes of Mental Health on ‘Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV-1 Escape’ with the goals of elucidating key knowledge gaps about this newly recognised entity, establishing a research agenda and assembling a ‘Global HIV-1 CSF Escape Consortium’ to fill these gaps.

Article Category

HIV cure research

Article Type

Conference report

Posted Date

06-10-2016

File Name
1475735023jve-2-242.pdf

HIV persistence in the CNS: the final frontier for a cure?

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